What to Do When Your Washing Machine Won’t Drain | The Home Service Club

What to Do When Your Washing Machine Won’t Drain

Nobody wants to hear their washing machine stop only to open it and see their clothes still drowning in water. When you notice your washing machine won’t drain, you begin to wonder just how you’ll fix your washer and if you’ll need to call a professional. Understandably, you’re frustrated at the prospect of paying someone hundreds of dollars to fix your washer. Before you go into full panic mode, here are some steps to take if your washer won’t drain. In order to ensure your safety, before taking these steps, unplug the power cord from the wall, or flip the circuit breaker.

How to fix a washing machine that won’t drain

  1. Check the drain hose
  2. Check the lid switch
  3. Check the belts
  4. Check the drain pump
  5. Check the drain
  6. If all else fails, call a professional or your home warranty company

Check the drain hose

The drain hose is attached to the back of the washer. Simply put, the drain hose is the pathway the water takes in order to exit the washing machine. If that drain hose is clogged, water may remain trapped inside the washer instead of draining out like normal. Often, the lack of drainage may be caused by a simple kink in the drain hose. Many times, this happens because the washer has been accidentally pushed up against the hose, pinching if off and inhibiting water from passing through. A kink of this nature is caused by the accidental bumping of the washer, or by the washer itself spinning rapidly inside, causing the entire machine to move slightly and push the hose against the wall.

First, check to see if there is a kink. If a kink isn’t the culprit, inspect the inside of the drain hose to see if there is an object or piece of clothing blocking the passage of water. For this step, particularly, you’ll want to keep a bucket close by to catch any excess water that may be present when you look into the tube. Start by using a flashlight to see if you can peer inside the hose and see any blockages. If that doesn’t work, you may need to remove the hose from the machine and use the garden hose to run some water through it to try to clear out any blockages. Once you believe you’ve cleared out whatever was blocking drainage, reattach the hose to the washer, turn on the washer, and set the rinse cycle to “on” to see if the washer will drain.

Check the lid switch

The lid switch is the mechanism that tells the washer to stop its spin cycle when the lid is opened. Most often, the lid switch is activated by a small tab on the washer lid that presses the switch down when the lid closes. Since the washer lid is opened and closed many times, the lid switch is one of the more commonly broken washing machine parts. It’s high on the list of things to check when you’re determining how to fix a washing machine that won’t drain.

To determine if your lid switch is broken, close the lid of your machine and see if you hear a slight click. If you don’t hear a click, it’s likely your lid switch is broken and your washing machine won’t drain. It is possible to fix the lid switch on your own, but it can become very frustrating and time consuming. If you do find that your lid switch is broken, you may be better calling a washing machine repair person or your home warranty company than trying to fix it yourself. In any case, if you do happen to determine the likely issue before the machine repair specialist arrives, you’ll be able to steer them in the right direction and get your washer back to working condition more quickly.

Check the belts

Most washing machines have two belts: the pump belt, and the main belt. Often, drainage issues are caused by a broken pump belt. It’s rare that the main belt breaks, but if it does, it’s a problem in and of itself that will need fixing. In order to access these belts, you’ll need to find a manufacturer’s diagram of your specific washer model. Often, you can find this information online. Keep in mind also that front-loading washers may be set up differently than top-loading washers.

Check the drain pump

To fix your washer that won’t drain, next check the pumps. Similar to the belts, in order to inspect the drain pump, you’ll need to determine where it is located on your model. Disassemble it carefully, remove and clean the screen, ensure the fan blades are rotating smoothly, and check the pump outlet to see if there are any objects or pieces of clothing trapped inside. Lastly, check for leaks or cracks. If you determine that the pump impeller is worn down or in bad condition, you’ll need a new pump.

Check the drain

If your washing machine won’t drain, be sure to check the washer drain itself, as drain problems could be at the root of your issues. You may need to push a plumbers snake or a spare metal hanger through the drain to ensure any blockages are cleared out. Naturally, if the drain is clogged, your washer will not drain properly.

Call a professional or your home warranty company

If you have a home warranty, there’s no need to worry about paying for expensive repairs. Simply contact your home warranty company and they’ll handle it. That said, if you can easily determine the underlying issue behind why your washing machine won’t drain, you’ll be able to let them know what the possible issues are, which will often save you a lot of time.

If you do not have a home warranty, you may find yourself with an expensive repair bill. While not ideal, some prefer to contact a professional repair person since they don’t feel comfortable handling the repairs themselves and want to ensure things are done right.

If your washer won’t drain and you’ve followed the steps we’ve outlined, you’ll be well on your way to fixing the problem.

Location, Location, Location (and Price): A Breakdown of House Affordability by State

Real Estate by State: A Breakdown of House Affordability Across the US

It’s been said that a home is the most expensive purchase the average person will ever make. It’s also been said that when it comes to real estate, the three most important factors are “location, location, and location.” Interestingly enough, for those in the market to purchase a home, location and price are often even more intertwined than one might expect (and we’re not just talking about how close the schools are or whether there’s easy freeway access).

Every state in the Nation is its own unique economic microcosm — the worth of a dollar can depend pretty heavily on where that dollar is being spent. Real estate prices are particularly dependant on region. For example, a home that might go for $500k in California may only cost you $150k in Ohio. To add more variables to the mix, average salaries and household incomes vary from state to state as well. The question then is this: How affordable are homes in every state, and how much should you be earning if you plan to purchase one?

Well, we’ve got the answers.

Using data from every part of the country, we’ve compiled state-specific information on home listings, average salaries, median homeowner incomes, and more. So, if you’re ready to purchase a home somewhere in the U.S., we can tell you what kind of money you’ll need to make it happen.

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Alabama

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $47,960
  • Median household income: $44,765
  • Median home listing price: $143,500
  • Random fact: The song Sweet Home Alabama shares its name with an actual place. Sweet Home, Alabama is a historic house on Arlington Avenue that combines Queen Anne and Neoclassical styles.

Alaska

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $67,280
  • Median household income: $73,355
  • Median home listing price: $291,536
  • Random fact: Looking for a some beachfront property? Alaska has more coastline than the rest of the United States combined. Just make sure to pack some snow shoes.

Arizona

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $67,280
  • Median household income: $51,492
  • Median home listing price: $209,000
  • Random fact: Ever heard the children’s rhyme “London Bridges Falling Down?” The original London Bridge was dismantled, shaped stone-by-stone, and rebuilt in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

Arkansas

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $41,040
  • Median household income: $41,995
  • Median home listing price: $145,000
  • Random fact: A historic restoration area in Little Rock, Arkansas called the Quapaw Quarter features Victorian and antebellum homes, chapels, and civil war barracks.

California

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $120,120
  • Median household income: $64,500
  • Median home listing price: $422,500
  • Random fact: California is the most populated state in America. With almost 40,000,000 residents, one in eight United States residents live there.

Colorado

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $100,200
  • Median household income: $63,909
  • Median home listing price: $300,000
  • Random fact: After the discovery of “The Gregory Lode” in a gulch near Central City, Colorado, the area became known as “The Richest Square Mile on Earth.”

Connecticut

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $75,280
  • Median household income: $71,346
  • Median home listing price: $227,500
  • Random fact: The total forested area in Connecticut was approximately 10% in 1800. Today the total forested area is about 60%.

Delaware

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $67,960
  • Median household income: $61,255
  • Median home listing price: $212,000
  • Random fact: The United States’ first scheduled railroad began in New Castle, Delaware in 1831.

Florida

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $70,360
  • Median household income: $49,426
  • Median home listing price: $185,000
  • Random fact: With high heat and humidity in Florida, it is no surprise that the first mechanical refrigerator was invented there in 1851 by Dr. John Gorrie.

Georgia

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $59,520
  • Median household income: $51,244
  • Median home listing price: $166,900
  • Random fact: President Jefferson Davis, and the confederate Generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee are immortalized in the world’s largest sculpture at Stone Mountain, Georgia.

Hawaii

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $153,520
  • Median household income: $73,486
  • Median home listing price: $485,000
  • Random fact: The closest landmass to Hawaii is California, 2,390 miles away, making Hawaii the most isolated population center on the planet.

Idaho

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $70,360
  • Median household income: $48,275
  • Median home listing price: $210,489
  • Random fact: Henry Harmon Spalding brought the first potato to Lapwai, Idaho, in 1836. Today Idaho produces one-third of all potatoes grown in the United States.

Illinois

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $53,880
  • Median household income: $59,588
  • Median home listing price: $185,000
  • Random fact: The world’s first skyscraper was the Home Insurance Building in Chicago, Illinois. Built in 1885 and standing ten stories high, it towered over the rest of the city.

Indiana

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $42,560
  • Median household income: $50,532
  • Median home listing price: $163,233
  • Random fact: Ever wonder where all those letters to Santa Claus end up? Santa Claus, Indiana receives over half of a million letters during the holiday season.

Iowa

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $44,360
  • Median household income: $54,736
  • Median home listing price: $144,300
  • Random fact: Sliced bread was first invented by Otto Rohwedder in Davenport, Iowa.

Kansas

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $43,160
  • Median household income: $53,906
  • Median home listing price: $157,938
  • Random fact: A ball of yarn located in Cawker City, Kansas weighs 16,750 pounds with a circumference of 38 feet, and is still being added to.

Kentucky

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $44,360
  • Median household income: $45,215
  • Median home listing price: $140,000
  • Random fact: The Kentucky Derby horse race is held on the first Saturday of May. It is the oldest continuously held horse race in the United States.

Louisiana

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $50,320
  • Median household income: $45,727
  • Median home listing price: $162,000
  • Random fact: The state government of Louisiana, termed the Napoleonic Code, is based off of the Civil Code established by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1804.

Maine

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $55,520
  • Median household income: $51,494
  • Median home listing price: $235,220
  • Random fact: 90% (about 40 million pounds) of the United States lobster supply is caught off of the coast of Maine.

Maryland

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $101,320
  • Median household income: $75,847
  • Median home listing price: $242,000
  • Random fact: In 1902, Maryland became the first state to pass a workers’ compensation law, but it was later declared unconstitutional.

Massachusetts

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $101,320
  • Median household income: $70,628
  • Median home listing price: $339,900
  • Random fact: In 1716, America’s first lighthouse was built in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts.

Michigan

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $40,800
  • Median household income: $51,084
  • Median home listing price: $134,900
  • Random fact: Detroit, Michigan is called the car capital of the world, producing approximately 2 million cars and trucks per year.

Minnesota

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $64,720
  • Median household income: $63,488
  • Median home listing price: $219,900
  • Random fact: Known as the “Land of 10,000 Lakes,” Minnesota contains 11,842 lakes that have an area over ten acres.

Mississippi

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $44,360
  • Median household income: $40,593
  • Median home listing price: $207,783
  • Random fact: The world’s first lung transplant and heart transplant were performed at Mississippi Medical Center in 1963 and 1964, respectively.

Missouri

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $42,200
  • Median household income: $50,238
  • Median home listing price: $159,668
  • Random fact: Missouri was named after a Sioux tribe of Native Americans called the Missouris. The word “Missouri” means “wooden canoe people.”

Montana

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $75,520
  • Median household income: $49,509
  • Median home listing price: $230,608
  • Random fact: The average square mile of land in Montana contains 3.3 deer, 1.4 pronghorn antelope, and 1.4 elk.

Nebraska

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $51,520
  • Median household income: $54,996
  • Median home listing price: $152,000
  • Random fact: The nickname of Nebraska used to be the “Tree Planter’s State.”  With the increase in corn crops the nickname was changed to the “Cornhusker State.”

Nevada

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $73,120
  • Median household income: $52,431
  • Median home listing price: $216,000
  • Random fact: The phrase, “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas” was originally coined, “What happens here, stays here” — first used in Nevada’s Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority ad campaigns.

New Hampshire

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $68,440
  • Median household income: $70,303
  • Median home listing price: $232,000
  • Random fact: Six months before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, New Hampshire declared independence from England, becoming the first colony to cut ties with the mother country.

New Jersey

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $69,640
  • Median household income: $72,222
  • Median home listing price: $265,000
  • Random fact: With 525 diners in New Jersey, it is known as the “Diner Capital of the Country.”

New Mexico

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $54,880
  • Median household income: $45,382
  • Median home listing price: $196,330
  • Random fact: Santa Fe, New Mexico was founded by Spanish settlers 10 years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth.

New York

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $91,720
  • Median household income: $60,850
  • Median home listing price: $247,000
  • Random fact: The only college in the world that offers a Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Cosmetics and Fragrance Marketing is the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City, New York.

North Carolina

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $63,840
  • Median household income: $47,830
  • Median home listing price: $177,000
  • Random fact: The first successful powered aircraft flight occurred at Kill Devil Hill, North Carolina by the Wright Brothers.

North Dakota

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $56,000
  • Median household income: $60,557
  • Median home listing price: $190,000
  • Random fact: North Dakota is the number-one producer of honey in the United States. The state produces approximately 33.7 million pounds of honey per year.

Ohio

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $38,400
  • Median household income: $51,075
  • Median home listing price: $130,000
  • Random fact: After the invention of the electric traffic light in 1912 by Lester Wire, the first traffic signal system was installed on East 105th Street in Cleveland, Ohio.

Oklahoma

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $45,320
  • Median household income: $48,568
  • Median home listing price: $130,500
  • Random fact: The world’s first parking meter was installed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on July 16, 1935.

Oregon

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $87,160
  • Median household income: $54,148
  • Median home listing price: $275,000
  • Random fact: With over 250 ghost towns, Oregon has the largest number of abandoned towns in the nation.

Pennsylvania

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $47,960
  • Median household income: $55,702
  • Median home listing price: $161,000
  • Random fact: Pennsylvania was the first state to include its website URL on its licence plate designs.

Rhode Island

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $69,640
  • Median household income: $58,073
  • Median home listing price: $230,000
  • Random fact: With an area of only 1,214 square miles, Rhode Island is the smallest state in the United States. The distance North to South is 48 miles and the distance West to East is 37 miles.

South Carolina

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $58,840
  • Median household income: $47,238
  • Median home listing price: $161,500
  • Random fact: At one time, South Carolina’s license plate read “The Iodine State.” This nickname was used to bring attention to the high levels of the chemical found in the states fruits and vegetables by the South Carolina Natural Resources Commission.

South Dakota

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $55,360
  • Median household income: $54,467
  • Median home listing price: $182,900
  • Random fact: One of the most famous American monuments is Mount Rushmore National Memorial fount in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The monument only took 14 years and $1 million to complete.

Tennessee

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $55,760
  • Median household income: $47,275
  • Median home listing price: $145,000
  • Random fact: Tennessee was given the nickname “The Volunteer State,” during the war of 1812 after Tennessee soldiers served under Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans.

Texas

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $66,080
  • Median household income: $55,653
  • Median home listing price: $214,783
  • Random fact: Texas is known as “The Lone Star State” to represent its previous status as an independent republic.

Utah

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $83,720
  • Median household income: $62,912
  • Median home listing price: $258,665
  • Random fact: The world’s first transcontinental railroad was completed in Promontory, Utah in 1869, where the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads met.

Vermont

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $62,600
  • Median household income: $56,990
  • Median home listing price: $195,000
  • Random fact: The only state capital without a McDonald’s restaurant is Montpelier, Vermont.

Virginia

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $71,960
  • Median household income: $66,262
  • Median home listing price: $297,000
  • Random fact: Beginning in colonial times, tobacco became Virginia’s cash crop. To this day many still benefit from the crop in Virginia.

Washington

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $87,040
  • Median household income: $64,129
  • Median home listing price: $299,000
  • Random fact: Seattle, Washington is home to the world’s first revolving restaurant. It is located 500 feet above sea level atop the Space Needle.

West Virginia

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $38,320
  • Median household income: $42,019
  • Median home listing price: $122,550
  • Random fact: Due to civil war tensions, West Virginia became the only state to gain sovereignty by order of the President of the United States.

Wisconsin

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $50,080
  • Median household income: $55,638
  • Median home listing price: $167,200
  • Random fact: The American Birkebeiner in Wisconsin is the largest cross country ski race in the United States. Approximately 5,000 competitors race each year.

Wyoming

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $58,000
  • Median household income: $60,214
  • Median home listing price: $219,450
  • Random fact: The majority of Yellowstone National Park is located in Wyoming. Many of its natural wonders are the result of the park being the basin of an active supervolcano.

 

How to Prevent Home Flooding: 5 Tips

How to Prevent Home Flooding: 5 Tips

Home floods are expensive, time consuming, and can destroy precious family memories. Thankfully, there are a number of steps homeowners can take to prevent the most common home flood causes: ice dams, burst water heaters, burst pipes, clogged gutters, and poor maintenance. Follow the simple home maintenance tips below to prevent serious water damage in your home.

1 – Prevent Ice Dams

During cold winter months, heat can seep out through your home’s roof causing accumulated snow to partially melt. As the snow melt runs down, it can refreeze again once it hits a colder area of your roof. Over the course of a few weeks or sometimes just days, this ice can build up and cause water to pool up on your roof. The end result is a dangerous and damaging ice dam. The standing water that results from ice dams can cause severe damage as it soaks into the roof.

To prevent ice dams, make sure that your home’s attic is thoroughly insulated; escaping heat is what generally causes ice dams in the first place. Additionally, you should keep an eye out for the most common sign of an ice dam: large icicles hanging from your roof. While icicles look great, they are a sign of a major problem and require immediate attention.

2 – Maintain Your Water Heater

A poorly maintained water heater is a flood waiting to happen. A faulty TRP valve, built up sediment, or unchecked leaks can cause serious damage. Most of the time, yearly water heater maintenance, which can be performed by you, will prevent major problems from arising unexpectedly.

If you’d rather rule out the possibility of a burst water heater altogether, check into replacing it with a tankless water heater. A tankless water heater is just what it sounds like: a water heater without a tank. Instead, water is instantaneously heated on demand. Besides eliminating the risk of a flood, a tankless water heater is also more energy efficient and ensures that you’ll never run out of hot water.

3 – Insulate Exposed Pipes

As the temperature outside drops, water in exposed pipes can freeze. If the flow of water is blocked, pressure can build up until the pipe explodes. A burst pipe can cause a serious amount of damage in just a short period of time as water gushes out.

To prevent this problem, walk around your home and check for pipes that aren’t insulated. This process is especially critical in unheated parts of your home. Special jackets can be wrapped around these pipes to keep the cold air out. For a better solution, check with a plumber about redirecting these pipes to a better location.

4 – Keep Gutters Clean

Cleaning out gutters isn’t exactly on anyone’s list of favorite things to do. For this reason, far too many homeowners allow leaves, animal droppings, sticks, and other debris to build up and block the gutter. When this happens, the rain water and snow melt will have no where to go; instead it will simply sit on your roof. Overtime, the shingles will become damaged, wood can rot, and mold can grow. If left long enough, serious structural problems can occur. If you’d prefer to reduce the number of cleanings necessary, keep trees trimmed and don’t let them hang over your roof.

5 – Don’t Ignore Small Leaks

A minor leak is tempting for many homeowners to ignore; however, out of sight shouldn’t be become out of mind. Frequently, a small leak can be a sign of a much larger problem. All homeowners should look out for the following: a musty smell, discolored walls or ceiling, mold or mildew, water pooling, and peeling paint. If you find any of these in your home, call a plumber right away to check out the problem.

Critical Furnace Maintenance Tips

Critical Furnace Maintenance Tips

Most furnaces are buried behind a closet door or hidden in a garage, making it easy to forget about basic maintenance. However, caring for your heating system saves you money over time. The system runs more efficiently, reducing energy costs, and also lasts longer than a neglected furnace. Several crucial maintenance tips should be followed to extend the machine’s lifespan and keep the entire family comfortable.

Physical Inspection

Turn the system off and grab a flashlight. You want to evaluate as much of the furnace’s exterior as possible. You’re looking for cracks or loose parts across the heat exchanger or outside housing. Run the system while observing it, but don’t place any limbs into the area. Look for obvious signs of vibration or unusual sounds. Observation is one of the easiest ways to find small problems before they become huge repair bills. If you check your furnace once a month, for example, you’ll be able to decipher between normal and unusual sounds or movements.

Clean It Out

When you observe your furnace, you may see a fine dust layer across coils. As the system pulls air into its components, dust is typically filtered out by an air filter. However, dust in the surrounding air eventually settles on furnace components, reducing their efficiency. Vacuum off the coils using a brush attachment, being careful to turn the system off when you work closely with it. As you reveal the clean coils, keep a wary eye out for any small cracks. Any possible leaks could come from a hairline fracture.

Test The Thermostat

Your thermostat controls the furnace’s activation, saving you money when it runs accurately. Test the thermostat by setting it at varying temperatures. Verify that it turns on when it reaches its temperature threshold. Because today’s thermostats are essentially small computers, many people opt for appliance insurance when they buy the unit initially. Some electronic issues are covered by limited warranties, but insurance covers other problems. Look for any frayed wires around the thermostat and any extensions into the furnace itself. Don’t touch any wires. If you find a frayed section, it’s best to contact a professional for help.

Air Filter Consideration

Air filters stop particulates from building up in the furnace, providing efficiency for all components. When you let the filter fill up, however, it fails to sift the air and forms a barrier. The furnace works harder to pull air in, effectively reducing its lifespan and driving up energy costs. Replace the air filter once a month during its busy season. Alternatively, purchase a reusable filter that can be rinsed. You’ll save money on filters and reduce landfill waste simultaneously.

Drain System

Furnaces convert cold air into warm breezes, but this conversion process also produces condensate. Moisture from the air drips into the furnace’s drain system, typically evaporating from a pan or moving along a pipe to the home’s plumbing system. Check and clean out the drain system periodically. Sediment may build up, causing a blockage and subsequent water damage. The drain should always be clear because condensate drips constantly as the system operates.

Professional Inspection

One of the best maintenance tips is simply hiring a professional once a year. They can reach furnace areas safely to evaluate any possible problems. Specialized cleaning tools make the furnace look brand new. They can also tweak its performance to save you even more energy over time. Avoiding professional inspections only makes the system vulnerable to breakdowns at the worst times. You don’t want to have a failing furnace during a cold snap. Choose a yearly inspection to see if your maintenance tricks are paying off.

From vacuuming the furnace to simply changing the filter, your consistent maintenance does pay off in the long run. It’s possible for this appliance to last a decade or more with diligent care and observation.