What to Do When Your Washing Machine Won’t Drain | The Home Service Club

What to Do When Your Washing Machine Won’t Drain

Nobody wants to hear their washing machine stop only to open it and see their clothes still drowning in water. When you notice your washing machine won’t drain, you begin to wonder just how you’ll fix your washer and if you’ll need to call a professional. Understandably, you’re frustrated at the prospect of paying someone hundreds of dollars to fix your washer. Before you go into full panic mode, here are some steps to take if your washer won’t drain. In order to ensure your safety, before taking these steps, unplug the power cord from the wall, or flip the circuit breaker.

How to fix a washing machine that won’t drain

  1. Check the drain hose
  2. Check the lid switch
  3. Check the belts
  4. Check the drain pump
  5. Check the drain
  6. If all else fails, call a professional or your home warranty company

Check the drain hose

The drain hose is attached to the back of the washer. Simply put, the drain hose is the pathway the water takes in order to exit the washing machine. If that drain hose is clogged, water may remain trapped inside the washer instead of draining out like normal. Often, the lack of drainage may be caused by a simple kink in the drain hose. Many times, this happens because the washer has been accidentally pushed up against the hose, pinching if off and inhibiting water from passing through. A kink of this nature is caused by the accidental bumping of the washer, or by the washer itself spinning rapidly inside, causing the entire machine to move slightly and push the hose against the wall.

First, check to see if there is a kink. If a kink isn’t the culprit, inspect the inside of the drain hose to see if there is an object or piece of clothing blocking the passage of water. For this step, particularly, you’ll want to keep a bucket close by to catch any excess water that may be present when you look into the tube. Start by using a flashlight to see if you can peer inside the hose and see any blockages. If that doesn’t work, you may need to remove the hose from the machine and use the garden hose to run some water through it to try to clear out any blockages. Once you believe you’ve cleared out whatever was blocking drainage, reattach the hose to the washer, turn on the washer, and set the rinse cycle to “on” to see if the washer will drain.

Check the lid switch

The lid switch is the mechanism that tells the washer to stop its spin cycle when the lid is opened. Most often, the lid switch is activated by a small tab on the washer lid that presses the switch down when the lid closes. Since the washer lid is opened and closed many times, the lid switch is one of the more commonly broken washing machine parts. It’s high on the list of things to check when you’re determining how to fix a washing machine that won’t drain.

To determine if your lid switch is broken, close the lid of your machine and see if you hear a slight click. If you don’t hear a click, it’s likely your lid switch is broken and your washing machine won’t drain. It is possible to fix the lid switch on your own, but it can become very frustrating and time consuming. If you do find that your lid switch is broken, you may be better calling a washing machine repair person or your home warranty company than trying to fix it yourself. In any case, if you do happen to determine the likely issue before the machine repair specialist arrives, you’ll be able to steer them in the right direction and get your washer back to working condition more quickly.

Check the belts

Most washing machines have two belts: the pump belt, and the main belt. Often, drainage issues are caused by a broken pump belt. It’s rare that the main belt breaks, but if it does, it’s a problem in and of itself that will need fixing. In order to access these belts, you’ll need to find a manufacturer’s diagram of your specific washer model. Often, you can find this information online. Keep in mind also that front-loading washers may be set up differently than top-loading washers.

Check the drain pump

To fix your washer that won’t drain, next check the pumps. Similar to the belts, in order to inspect the drain pump, you’ll need to determine where it is located on your model. Disassemble it carefully, remove and clean the screen, ensure the fan blades are rotating smoothly, and check the pump outlet to see if there are any objects or pieces of clothing trapped inside. Lastly, check for leaks or cracks. If you determine that the pump impeller is worn down or in bad condition, you’ll need a new pump.

Check the drain

If your washing machine won’t drain, be sure to check the washer drain itself, as drain problems could be at the root of your issues. You may need to push a plumbers snake or a spare metal hanger through the drain to ensure any blockages are cleared out. Naturally, if the drain is clogged, your washer will not drain properly.

Call a professional or your home warranty company

If you have a home warranty, there’s no need to worry about paying for expensive repairs. Simply contact your home warranty company and they’ll handle it. That said, if you can easily determine the underlying issue behind why your washing machine won’t drain, you’ll be able to let them know what the possible issues are, which will often save you a lot of time.

If you do not have a home warranty, you may find yourself with an expensive repair bill. While not ideal, some prefer to contact a professional repair person since they don’t feel comfortable handling the repairs themselves and want to ensure things are done right.

If your washer won’t drain and you’ve followed the steps we’ve outlined, you’ll be well on your way to fixing the problem.

Location, Location, Location (and Price): A Breakdown of House Affordability by State

Real Estate by State: A Breakdown of House Affordability Across the US

It’s been said that a home is the most expensive purchase the average person will ever make. It’s also been said that when it comes to real estate, the three most important factors are “location, location, and location.” Interestingly enough, for those in the market to purchase a home, location and price are often even more intertwined than one might expect (and we’re not just talking about how close the schools are or whether there’s easy freeway access).

Every state in the Nation is its own unique economic microcosm — the worth of a dollar can depend pretty heavily on where that dollar is being spent. Real estate prices are particularly dependant on region. For example, a home that might go for $500k in California may only cost you $150k in Ohio. To add more variables to the mix, average salaries and household incomes vary from state to state as well. The question then is this: How affordable are homes in every state, and how much should you be earning if you plan to purchase one?

Well, we’ve got the answers.

Using data from every part of the country, we’ve compiled state-specific information on home listings, average salaries, median homeowner incomes, and more. So, if you’re ready to purchase a home somewhere in the U.S., we can tell you what kind of money you’ll need to make it happen.

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Alabama

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $47,960
  • Median household income: $44,765
  • Median home listing price: $143,500
  • Random fact: The song Sweet Home Alabama shares its name with an actual place. Sweet Home, Alabama is a historic house on Arlington Avenue that combines Queen Anne and Neoclassical styles.

Alaska

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $67,280
  • Median household income: $73,355
  • Median home listing price: $291,536
  • Random fact: Looking for a some beachfront property? Alaska has more coastline than the rest of the United States combined. Just make sure to pack some snow shoes.

Arizona

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $67,280
  • Median household income: $51,492
  • Median home listing price: $209,000
  • Random fact: Ever heard the children’s rhyme “London Bridges Falling Down?” The original London Bridge was dismantled, shaped stone-by-stone, and rebuilt in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

Arkansas

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $41,040
  • Median household income: $41,995
  • Median home listing price: $145,000
  • Random fact: A historic restoration area in Little Rock, Arkansas called the Quapaw Quarter features Victorian and antebellum homes, chapels, and civil war barracks.

California

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $120,120
  • Median household income: $64,500
  • Median home listing price: $422,500
  • Random fact: California is the most populated state in America. With almost 40,000,000 residents, one in eight United States residents live there.

Colorado

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $100,200
  • Median household income: $63,909
  • Median home listing price: $300,000
  • Random fact: After the discovery of “The Gregory Lode” in a gulch near Central City, Colorado, the area became known as “The Richest Square Mile on Earth.”

Connecticut

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $75,280
  • Median household income: $71,346
  • Median home listing price: $227,500
  • Random fact: The total forested area in Connecticut was approximately 10% in 1800. Today the total forested area is about 60%.

Delaware

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $67,960
  • Median household income: $61,255
  • Median home listing price: $212,000
  • Random fact: The United States’ first scheduled railroad began in New Castle, Delaware in 1831.

Florida

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $70,360
  • Median household income: $49,426
  • Median home listing price: $185,000
  • Random fact: With high heat and humidity in Florida, it is no surprise that the first mechanical refrigerator was invented there in 1851 by Dr. John Gorrie.

Georgia

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $59,520
  • Median household income: $51,244
  • Median home listing price: $166,900
  • Random fact: President Jefferson Davis, and the confederate Generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee are immortalized in the world’s largest sculpture at Stone Mountain, Georgia.

Hawaii

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $153,520
  • Median household income: $73,486
  • Median home listing price: $485,000
  • Random fact: The closest landmass to Hawaii is California, 2,390 miles away, making Hawaii the most isolated population center on the planet.

Idaho

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $70,360
  • Median household income: $48,275
  • Median home listing price: $210,489
  • Random fact: Henry Harmon Spalding brought the first potato to Lapwai, Idaho, in 1836. Today Idaho produces one-third of all potatoes grown in the United States.

Illinois

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $53,880
  • Median household income: $59,588
  • Median home listing price: $185,000
  • Random fact: The world’s first skyscraper was the Home Insurance Building in Chicago, Illinois. Built in 1885 and standing ten stories high, it towered over the rest of the city.

Indiana

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $42,560
  • Median household income: $50,532
  • Median home listing price: $163,233
  • Random fact: Ever wonder where all those letters to Santa Claus end up? Santa Claus, Indiana receives over half of a million letters during the holiday season.

Iowa

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $44,360
  • Median household income: $54,736
  • Median home listing price: $144,300
  • Random fact: Sliced bread was first invented by Otto Rohwedder in Davenport, Iowa.

Kansas

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $43,160
  • Median household income: $53,906
  • Median home listing price: $157,938
  • Random fact: A ball of yarn located in Cawker City, Kansas weighs 16,750 pounds with a circumference of 38 feet, and is still being added to.

Kentucky

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $44,360
  • Median household income: $45,215
  • Median home listing price: $140,000
  • Random fact: The Kentucky Derby horse race is held on the first Saturday of May. It is the oldest continuously held horse race in the United States.

Louisiana

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $50,320
  • Median household income: $45,727
  • Median home listing price: $162,000
  • Random fact: The state government of Louisiana, termed the Napoleonic Code, is based off of the Civil Code established by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1804.

Maine

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $55,520
  • Median household income: $51,494
  • Median home listing price: $235,220
  • Random fact: 90% (about 40 million pounds) of the United States lobster supply is caught off of the coast of Maine.

Maryland

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $101,320
  • Median household income: $75,847
  • Median home listing price: $242,000
  • Random fact: In 1902, Maryland became the first state to pass a workers’ compensation law, but it was later declared unconstitutional.

Massachusetts

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $101,320
  • Median household income: $70,628
  • Median home listing price: $339,900
  • Random fact: In 1716, America’s first lighthouse was built in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts.

Michigan

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $40,800
  • Median household income: $51,084
  • Median home listing price: $134,900
  • Random fact: Detroit, Michigan is called the car capital of the world, producing approximately 2 million cars and trucks per year.

Minnesota

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $64,720
  • Median household income: $63,488
  • Median home listing price: $219,900
  • Random fact: Known as the “Land of 10,000 Lakes,” Minnesota contains 11,842 lakes that have an area over ten acres.

Mississippi

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $44,360
  • Median household income: $40,593
  • Median home listing price: $207,783
  • Random fact: The world’s first lung transplant and heart transplant were performed at Mississippi Medical Center in 1963 and 1964, respectively.

Missouri

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $42,200
  • Median household income: $50,238
  • Median home listing price: $159,668
  • Random fact: Missouri was named after a Sioux tribe of Native Americans called the Missouris. The word “Missouri” means “wooden canoe people.”

Montana

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $75,520
  • Median household income: $49,509
  • Median home listing price: $230,608
  • Random fact: The average square mile of land in Montana contains 3.3 deer, 1.4 pronghorn antelope, and 1.4 elk.

Nebraska

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $51,520
  • Median household income: $54,996
  • Median home listing price: $152,000
  • Random fact: The nickname of Nebraska used to be the “Tree Planter’s State.”  With the increase in corn crops the nickname was changed to the “Cornhusker State.”

Nevada

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $73,120
  • Median household income: $52,431
  • Median home listing price: $216,000
  • Random fact: The phrase, “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas” was originally coined, “What happens here, stays here” — first used in Nevada’s Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority ad campaigns.

New Hampshire

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $68,440
  • Median household income: $70,303
  • Median home listing price: $232,000
  • Random fact: Six months before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, New Hampshire declared independence from England, becoming the first colony to cut ties with the mother country.

New Jersey

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $69,640
  • Median household income: $72,222
  • Median home listing price: $265,000
  • Random fact: With 525 diners in New Jersey, it is known as the “Diner Capital of the Country.”

New Mexico

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $54,880
  • Median household income: $45,382
  • Median home listing price: $196,330
  • Random fact: Santa Fe, New Mexico was founded by Spanish settlers 10 years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth.

New York

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $91,720
  • Median household income: $60,850
  • Median home listing price: $247,000
  • Random fact: The only college in the world that offers a Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Cosmetics and Fragrance Marketing is the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City, New York.

North Carolina

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $63,840
  • Median household income: $47,830
  • Median home listing price: $177,000
  • Random fact: The first successful powered aircraft flight occurred at Kill Devil Hill, North Carolina by the Wright Brothers.

North Dakota

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $56,000
  • Median household income: $60,557
  • Median home listing price: $190,000
  • Random fact: North Dakota is the number-one producer of honey in the United States. The state produces approximately 33.7 million pounds of honey per year.

Ohio

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $38,400
  • Median household income: $51,075
  • Median home listing price: $130,000
  • Random fact: After the invention of the electric traffic light in 1912 by Lester Wire, the first traffic signal system was installed on East 105th Street in Cleveland, Ohio.

Oklahoma

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $45,320
  • Median household income: $48,568
  • Median home listing price: $130,500
  • Random fact: The world’s first parking meter was installed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on July 16, 1935.

Oregon

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $87,160
  • Median household income: $54,148
  • Median home listing price: $275,000
  • Random fact: With over 250 ghost towns, Oregon has the largest number of abandoned towns in the nation.

Pennsylvania

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $47,960
  • Median household income: $55,702
  • Median home listing price: $161,000
  • Random fact: Pennsylvania was the first state to include its website URL on its licence plate designs.

Rhode Island

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $69,640
  • Median household income: $58,073
  • Median home listing price: $230,000
  • Random fact: With an area of only 1,214 square miles, Rhode Island is the smallest state in the United States. The distance North to South is 48 miles and the distance West to East is 37 miles.

South Carolina

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $58,840
  • Median household income: $47,238
  • Median home listing price: $161,500
  • Random fact: At one time, South Carolina’s license plate read “The Iodine State.” This nickname was used to bring attention to the high levels of the chemical found in the states fruits and vegetables by the South Carolina Natural Resources Commission.

South Dakota

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $55,360
  • Median household income: $54,467
  • Median home listing price: $182,900
  • Random fact: One of the most famous American monuments is Mount Rushmore National Memorial fount in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The monument only took 14 years and $1 million to complete.

Tennessee

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $55,760
  • Median household income: $47,275
  • Median home listing price: $145,000
  • Random fact: Tennessee was given the nickname “The Volunteer State,” during the war of 1812 after Tennessee soldiers served under Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans.

Texas

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $66,080
  • Median household income: $55,653
  • Median home listing price: $214,783
  • Random fact: Texas is known as “The Lone Star State” to represent its previous status as an independent republic.

Utah

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $83,720
  • Median household income: $62,912
  • Median home listing price: $258,665
  • Random fact: The world’s first transcontinental railroad was completed in Promontory, Utah in 1869, where the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads met.

Vermont

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $62,600
  • Median household income: $56,990
  • Median home listing price: $195,000
  • Random fact: The only state capital without a McDonald’s restaurant is Montpelier, Vermont.

Virginia

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $71,960
  • Median household income: $66,262
  • Median home listing price: $297,000
  • Random fact: Beginning in colonial times, tobacco became Virginia’s cash crop. To this day many still benefit from the crop in Virginia.

Washington

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $87,040
  • Median household income: $64,129
  • Median home listing price: $299,000
  • Random fact: Seattle, Washington is home to the world’s first revolving restaurant. It is located 500 feet above sea level atop the Space Needle.

West Virginia

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $38,320
  • Median household income: $42,019
  • Median home listing price: $122,550
  • Random fact: Due to civil war tensions, West Virginia became the only state to gain sovereignty by order of the President of the United States.

Wisconsin

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $50,080
  • Median household income: $55,638
  • Median home listing price: $167,200
  • Random fact: The American Birkebeiner in Wisconsin is the largest cross country ski race in the United States. Approximately 5,000 competitors race each year.

Wyoming

  • Average salary needed to afford a home: $58,000
  • Median household income: $60,214
  • Median home listing price: $219,450
  • Random fact: The majority of Yellowstone National Park is located in Wyoming. Many of its natural wonders are the result of the park being the basin of an active supervolcano.

 

101 Stats Every Homeowner Should Know

101 Stats Every Homeowner Should Know

Before you take the plunge and purchase a home, here are some stats on home ownership you’ll want to keep in mind.

Appliance Care

  • The average lifespan of a clothes washer and dryer is 13 years (Nationwide)
  • The average lifespan of a dishwasher is 12 years (Nationwide)
  • The average lifespan of a stove is 20 years (Nationwide)
  • The average lifespan of a water heater is 11 years (Nationwide)
  • The average lifespan of a refrigerator is 14 years (Nationwide)
  • The average lifespan of a furnace is 18 years (Nationwide)
  • The average lifespan of a central air system is 11 years (Nationwide)

Energy Efficiency

  • Homes that use ENERGY STAR appliances save an average of $80 per year (Nationwide)
  • ENERGY STAR appliances consume 10-15% less water and energy than standard models (Nationwide)
  • The energy used in homes accounts for the third largest use of energy in the U.S. (Connect4Climate.org)
  • 65% of residential energy consumption is used and 35% is wasted (Connect4Climate.org)

Energy Usage

Resales

  • In 2017, the average time a home was on the market fell to a record low of only 3 weeks (National Association of Realtors ®)
  • In 2017, first-time home buyers accounted for 34% of all home buyers (National Association of Realtors ®)
  • Home remodeling only increases home value by 57% of the average project’s costs
  • The home remodeling upgrade with the largest return on investment is the kitchen (Remodeling Magazine)
  • The average cost of a bathroom remodel is $10,500, and the average ROI is 102% (DRM Investments LTD)
  • 13% of pre-owned homes are “for sale by owner” (DRM Investments LTD)
  • Two thirds of the cost of home improvement projects goes directly to increasing the home’s value (HGTV)

Homebuying

Lawn Care

  • Households in the U.S. expended close to $15.9 billion on gardening and lawn care services in 2015 (LawnStarter)
  • 57% of Americans erroneously think that if a lawn is not green, it means it is not healthy (BusinessWire)
  • Around two thirds of all water use in every household goes to watering the lawn (Plowz & Mowz)
  • It’s said that turfgrass can boost a home’s property value by 15 to 20% (Plowz & Mowz)
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Americans spend 73 hours each year doing yard work (Bankrate)
  • Nearly 65,000 people have to go to the hospital each year due to lawn-mowing related injuries (Plowz & Mowz)
  • Retail sales of lawn and garden supplies in the United States are expected in 2019 to reach $6.6 billion (LawnStarter)
  • As of 2018, it’s estimated that the landscaping and lawn care market is at $88 billion in revenue (IBISWorld)
  • The average cost to hire a weekly lawn mowing service is around $53 (Pro Referral)
  • Pest control costs anywhere from $50 for animal removal to $1,200 or more for termite extermination and repair (Fixr)

Utilities

  • According to the U.S. Department of Energy, the standard U.S. family spends an average of $2,060 annually for home utility bills (Energy Star)
  • Ceiling fans help save on utilities by enabling you to keep your thermostat two degrees lower in the winter and two degrees higher in the summer (The Simple Dollar)
  • Replacing a home’s five most used light bulbs with Energy Star varieties could save you up to $75 each year (Energy Saver)
  • In 2017, an estimated 273 billion kilowatthours of electricity were used by the U.S. residential and commercial sectors for lighting (U.S. Energy Information Administration)
  • Implementing upgrades suggested in a home energy audit could save you 5 to 30% on your utility bills each year (Energy Saver)
  • In 2016, there were around 70.8 million smart electricity meters installed in the U.S.  (U.S. Energy Information Administration)

Real Estate Market

  • In 2017, more than 5.5 million existing homes were sold (National Association of Realtors ®)
  • In 2017, 612 thousand newly-constructed homes sold (U.S. Census Bureau)
  • In 2016, the median new home size in the United States was 2,467 square feet, 61% larger than 40 years ago (The Wall Street Journal)
  • Median home has increased every decade in the U.S. since 1940 (ActiveRain, Inc.)
  • Those purchasing a new home often pay 2% to 5% of the overall purchase price just in closing costs (Investopedia)
  • The all-time high for mortgage rates was a whopping 18.45% in October 1981 (Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation)
  • It’s estimated that the U.S. has 5 times more vacant houses than homeless people (Truthdig)
  • Two-thirds of United States homes are occupied by their owner, with all the others being rentals (ActiveRain, Inc.)
  • In 2018, mortgage rates at one time averaged 4.33% on a 30-year fixed mortgage, which was among one of the lower mortgage rates in history (Interest.com)
  • In 2009, the United States recorded more foreclosures than marriages (Hartford Courant)
  • The FHFA states that the average price of a home in the U.S. increased by 34.71% from 2013 to 2017 (Investopedia)
  • The median home price for a married couple in 2016 was $208,500 (The New York Times)

General Home Maintenance

  • In the United States, homeowners spend an average of $9,080 on hidden expenses that like home improvement and taxes (MarketWatch)
  • Home maintenance costs including heating and A/C maintenance, gutter cleaning, pressure washing, yard work, and carpet cleaning cost an average of $3,021 per year (Zillow)
  • The National Fire Protection Association says that improper dryer cleaning may lead to the 15,000 annual dryer fires they respond to (National Fire Protection Association)
  • A leaky faucet can result in a gallon of wasted water per week (Oliver Heating & Cooling)
  • Homeowners spend an average of 1 to 4% of a home’s value each year on repairs and maintenance (U.S. News)
  • U.S. households spend on average $1,506 per year on home furnishings like carpet, flooring, appliances, and furniture (The Nest)
  • The average cost of appliance repair in the United States is $170 (HomeAdvisor             
  • It costs a minimum of $2000 to have professional roofers replace your roof, with prices reaching upwards of $8500 (Angie’s List)
  • To replace your home’s foundation it’ll cost an average of $4,436, with maximum prices being more than $10,000 (HomeAdvisor)
  • The national average for water damage repair and cleanup is $2,599 (HomeAdvisor)
  • The national average for wind damage repair is $7,229 (HomeAdvisor)
  • The national average for fire & smoke damage repair is $12,727 (HomeAdvisor)

Home Security

  • 37% of realtors say their clients see smart home devices or locks on as very important (National Association of Realtors ®)
  • A slim 15% of American households have a home security system, and only 54% of those homes understand how to use them (Statistic Brain)
  • In the United States, a burglary happens every 15 seconds (Jacksonville State University)
  • Burglaries often occur at a higher rate in summer and a lower rate in winter and spring (U.S. Department of Justice)
  • The average estimated monetary loss resulting from a burglary in the United States is a little more than $2,000 (Jacksonville State University)
  • In 28% of burglaries a member of the household is present (U.S. Department of Justice)
  • The risk of your residence being robbed is higher for rental properties than properties owned by occupants (FBI)
  • It’s expected that by 2020, there will be 22 million people using smart security (NextMarket Insights)
  • According to the FBI, the number of burglaries reported in the United States decreased by 28% from 2006 to 2015 (FBI)
  • Of burglaries reported in 2015, 72% were on residential property (FBI)
  • The most common way burglars enter is by destroying or removing a door (U.S. Department of Justice)
  • Home security systems that use a GSM chip cost $40 to $60 per month (ProtectAmerica)

Home Ownership Benefits

  • 88% of people who currently own homes say homeownership is a positive experience (HouseLogic)
  • 86% of homeowners say the income tax benefits of home ownership are a key reason to buy (ActiveRain, Inc.)
  • It’s estimated that a homeowner’s net worth is 34 times higher than a renter’s (HouseLogic)
  • 9 in 10 homeowners believe that owning a home is part of the American Dream (National Association of Realtors ®)
  • 72% of renters agree that over a time span of many years, it is smarter to own a home than to rent (HouseLogic)
  • Those who own homes are reported as healthier physically and psychologically than non-owners (National Association of Realtors ®)

Owner Statistics

Home Warranty Vs. Home Insurance

Home Warranty Vs. Home Insurance

Home Warranty Vs. Home Insurance

It’s easy to confuse a home warranty and home insurance. Both are important to homeowners, but they both cover very different things. It’s important that you understand the difference between the two so you can provide your home with the best coverage and put your mind at ease.

What is a Home Warranty?

A home warranty is not home insurance. A home warranty covers repair work for major appliances like washers, dryers, refrigerators, and even swimming pools. Furnaces, plumbing and electrical work, and air conditioning systems are also covered by home warranties.

Purchasing an appliance protection plan from a home warranty company is a great way to ensure your home is protected. Each plan has a predetermined level of protection and scope of coverages. Basic home warranties cover most appliances within your home. Purchasing a more advanced home warranty can cover more appliances, even those outside your home, like a swimming pool.

When something covered by a home warranty breaks or wears down, the home warranty company sends a contracted service provider to your home to assess the problem. Damage needing minimal repairs can happen on the first visit. More substantial repairs or replacements must be approved by the home warranty company. Home warranties cover the parts needed for repair and replacement if the damage is too great. Each visit by a service provider costs a certain amount that you pay.

Each home warranty contract is different. Your individual contract will specify what is and what isn’t covered. For an item to be covered by a home warranty, it must be within the main foundation of the home, unless specified in the contract (things like septic tanks, wells, and sometimes pools).

Home warranties allow homeowners to save money. Repairing or replacing appliances can easily cost several thousand dollars. With home warranties, homeowners pay the cost of the warranty, plus a service fee for each visit by a repair technician. If repairs or a replacement is needed, the home warranty company provides those at a discounted rate to the homeowner.

Having a home warranty increases the value of your home. If you’re looking to sell your home, getting a home warranty can attract more buyers, because the warranty can be transferred when a home is sold. Home buyers will feel more confident about buying a home with a home warranty because it eliminates the worry of surprise repairs.

For more information on plans and pricing, click here. Also, check our home warranty page to get answers to any other questions you may have.

What is Homeowners Insurance?

A home insurance policy is required by most banks before you can get a mortgage on a home. Homeowners insurance often covers damage from wind, fire, lightning strikes, hail, theft, and vandalism. A homeowner’s insurance policy covers the foundation of your home, protects your personal property from theft, and reduces liability from third party involvement.

A homeowner’s insurance policy is reviewed annually and can cost between $300-$1000. When you need to file a claim for your homeowner’s insurance policy, you pay a deductible and your policy covers the rest.

If you need to take advantage of your home insurance policy, an insurance adjuster will visit your home and fill a repair or replacement claim on the damaged items. When your insurance company approves the claim, they will charge you the deductible cost and pay for the balance of the repairs. The amount you pay for your deductible affects your yearly policy cost. A higher deductible results in a lower annual renewal fee.

 

Why should I have both?

Homeowner’s insurance and home warranties both cover different things. Having a home warranty and home insurance is the best way to ensure maximum protection for you and your home.

Home insurance policies typically cover:

  • The structure and contents of your house
  • Personal property like furniture, clothes, computers, TV, etc.
  • Jewelry coverage varies by plan. It may be itemized at full value, covered up to a certain amount, or not covered at all
  • Theft, lightning, vandalism, fire, windstorm, hail, falling objects such as a tree
  • Living expenses if your home is uninhabitable because of a natural disaster
  • Liability claims if someone is injured on your property and they decide to sue you

Home warranties typically cover:

  • Air conditioning
  • Plumbing
  • Heating and electrical systems
  • Appliances like refrigerators, dishwashers, washers, and dryers

More comprehensive plans are available and can be extended to things like:

  • Gas and water leaks
  • Ductwork
  • Sump pumps
  • Sprinkler systems
  • Pool equipment
  • Well pumps

Having a home warranty on top of your existing homeowner’s insurance policy provides more coverage to your home, appliances, and valuables.

Things to Consider

Lifestyle Needs

Purchasing a home warranty and home insurance isn’t as straightforward as we’d like it to be. It’s important to make sure you’re buying the best home warranty or insurance for your needs. Consider your lifestyle, how many people live in your home, and whether or not you have pets are just a few important things to think about before you purchase a home warranty or homeowner’s insurance.

Ease of Submitting a Claim

It’s also important to think to consider the ease of submitting a claim. Be sure to read your policy and warranty thoroughly to make sure you understand everything. You don’t want your repair or replacement to be stuck behind mountains of paperwork and months of cutting through red tape. You want a home warranty and insurance plan that can take care of you as quickly and painlessly as possible.

Cost

Don’t forget to think about costs of purchasing and renewing a home warranty and home insurance. Home warranties generally cost between $300-$500 each year. This cost covers the repair or replacement of your home’s appliances and systems. These warranty plans are renewed annually, and additional coverage for pools, washers, and dryers, and other complex systems can be added for an extra cost.

Homeowner’s insurance coverage varies based on the extent of coverage, location of the property, and according to state codes. Typically homeowner’s insurance can be purchased for between $300-$1000 annually.

Conclusion

Your home is one of your greatest investments. It’s important that you treat it like that, and protect it as well as you can. Having a home warranty in addition to your existing homeowner’s insurance policy is essential to having peace of mind. Having a home warranty will ensure that you and your home will always be taken care of.

How to Create Your Own Window Cleaning Solution

How to Create Your Own Window Cleaning Solution

How to Create Your Own Window Cleaning Solution

Cleaning the windows on and in your home is a difficult and time-consuming task. Doing it right is even harder. Do you ever feel like you’re just pushing the dirt around on your windows? Or that they look worse than when you started? It’s easy to be overwhelmed by all that goes into window cleaning. We’ve put together some helps to take the headache out of washing your windows. If you follow these tips and tricks, we’ll have you cleaning windows like a pro.

The Best Window Cleaning Solution

The best window washing solutions always use vinegar. Why is using vinegar so important to wash windows? Besides being non-toxic and antibacterial, vinegar is slightly acidic. This allows it to quickly break down the film and grime that accumulates on your windows. There are a lot of window cleaning solution recipes out there. Odds are, you’ve tried a lot of them, and none of them work as well as you hoped they would. The recipe we’ve got for you is a great way to clean your windows as quickly and efficiently as possible.

If it’s been a while since you’ve washed your windows, use this recipe:

  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup white vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon dish detergent (Dawn works best)

Once you’ve completed your initial wash, it’s recommended that you wash your windows at least twice a year. This recipe is perfect for maintaining the initial wash (though you can use the original recipe as many times as you want):

  • 1 c. water
  • 1 c. white vinegar

This mix can be made in bulk (for a bucket), or in a spray bottle. Both methods are effective. If you use a bucket and brush, attach a soft bristled brush or mop to an extended pole. Dip the brush in the solution and scrub the windows. Before the solution has dried, make sure to rinse it off with a hose. Using a fitted nozzle or sprayer attachment is really helpful. This method is best for tall houses, houses with lots of windows, and avoids the need for a ladder.

A lot of people like to make the mix in a spray bottle and clean each window individually. This will take a little more time, but depending on the number of windows you need to clean, and how closely you want to clean them, this method works great. This is also the preferred method for washing windows inside your house. Finding the right wipe to ensure a streak-free window is difficult. Popular methods are coffee filters, newspapers, or microfiber cloths. If you use a cloth, make sure it’s lint free. Paper towels are popular but can leave streaks and paper residue behind.

Other Window Cleaning Tips

  • For large windows, use a strip applicator. These long, thick cloths soak up a lot of water and easily remove dirt without scratching the glass.
  • Using a squeegee takes a little bit of practice, but can really improve your windows. Start in the top left corner of the soapy window and pull in a reverse “S” shape, wiping the blade at the end of each pull. Then, dry off little drips or remnants with a lint-free cloth.
  • If you have a multipaned window, using a large, handheld sponge or bristle brush works really well for washing. You can wipe dry with a lint-free cloth or use a small squeegee.
  • For stubborn spots, use fine 000 steel wool. This is great for targeting hard water stains that normal washing won’t get rid of.
  • Don’t wash windows that are in direct sunlight. Windows heat up quickly when exposed to sunlight. This can cause the water to evaporate before you’ve finished washing the windows and haven’t had a chance to wipe them off.
  • Wash windows on one side left to right. Then wash the other side top to bottom. This will let you see if you’ve missed spots on one side.

These tips and tricks will definitely improve your window cleaning abilities. Hopefully, this will take away some of the pain and trouble you’ve had in the past from cleaning windows. Now when you hear that voice inside your head telling you to clean your windows, you’ll be better prepared to take on the task.

50 Tips And Tricks On Water Conservation

50 Tips And Tricks On Water Conservation

With all the droughts and natural disasters happening around the world, water conservation is becoming more and more important. The supply of available water can’t keep with the demands we place on it. Here are a few useful tips and tricks to help you monitor and conserve your water use.

  1. Turn off the tap while brushing your teeth. You can save almost 150 gallons of water each month when you turn the water off.
  2. Take shorter showers. Shaving a few minutes off your shower time will greatly reduce the amount of water used.
  3. Fix leaks and leaky appliances. Whether you do it yourself or hire a plumber, fixing leaks will save lots of water.
  4. Monitor your water bill. If your bill goes up one month, check for leaks and extra unnecessary usage.
  5. Buy water efficient appliances like sinks, showers, and washing machines. The more efficient the machine, the less water they use.
  6. Flush less water. Older toilets use a lot of water. Fill a half gallon jug with water and put it in the toilet tank to use less water when you flush.
  7. Turn off the tap while you scrub your hands. Keeping water from running while you wash your hands will save several gallons each month.
  8. Wash only full loads of laundry. Doing fewer large loads of laundry can save a lot of water.
  9. Run your dishwasher only when it’s full for the same reason as with the washing machine.
  10. Using a dishwasher is more efficient than washing dishes by hand.
  11. Insulating your pipes will keep them from freezing in the winter and will also help your water heat up faster.
  12. Don’t use water to defrost food. This popular method of defrosting uses a lot of water.
  13. Avoid flushing the toilet for little things. Doing this can save 5-6 gallons per flush.
  14. When you wash dishes by hand, fill up the sink instead of letting the water run while you scrub.
  15. Carefully water your lawn. Place sprinklers to avoid overlap and watering things that don’t need watering (like sidewalks and the road).
  16. Water your lawn only when it needs to be watered.
  17. Using less electricity can also save water. Power plants are cooled on thousands of gallons of water. By using less electricity, you help save water.
  18. Harvesting rainwater is becoming more popular. There are a lot of things you can do with it.
  19. Keep a pitcher with water in the fridge, or use a water bottle instead of turning on the tap when you need a drink.
  20. Teach your kids how to save water. Every little bit helps.
  21. Learn where the emergency water shut off for your home is and how to use it.
  22. Have your plumbing and pipes inspected regularly? This can prevent major problems from happening.
  23. Clean your sidewalks and driveways with brooms instead of the hose.
  24. Use mulch in your garden and flower beds to help keep water in the soil longer.
  25. Adding clay into the dirt in your garden and flower bed helps water move through the soil more slowly.
  26. Water your plants and grass in the early morning to avoid losing water to evaporation
  27. Evaluate your use of water for lawn decorations like birdbaths and water fountains.
  28. Reduce the amount of grass and plants in your yard. Xeriscaping is becoming a popular, water saving way to decorate your yard.
  29. Wash your car in a car wash, not at home. Car washes recycle the water they use, which is something you can’t do at home.
  30. Save the water you cook pasta in to water your plants. Just make sure it’s cool first.
  31. Cook food in as little water as possible.
  32. Washing clothes in cooler water reduces water usage and energy
  33. Check to see if city or county codes will let you cycle your used washing machine water to water your plants.
  34. When filling the bathtub, plug the tub as soon as the water starts, then adjust the temperature as the tub fills.
  35. Plug the sink when you shave instead of running water to rinse your razor.
  36. Taking a shower instead of a bath saves several gallons of water.
  37. Make sure to check for leaks in your faucets. If your faucets drip once a second, that can total up to five gallons each day.
  38. Mow your lawn between 1.5 to 2 inches. Taller grass shades the roots and helps prevent water from evaporating.
  39. Aerating your lawn will help water reach the roots of the grass more quickly.
  40. Fertilizing your lawn increases the need for water. Only use as much fertilizer as you need.
  41. Make sure to weed regularly. Weeds compete with grass and plants for water and nutrients.
  42. If you have a swimming pool, use a pool cover to reduce evaporation and maintain pool chemistry.
  43. Don’t overfill your pool. Lower water levels reduce spilling and keep water from splashing out.
  44. If you have the option, join a community rec center and use their pool.
  45. Winterize outdoor spigots to keep pipes from freezing or bursting in the winter.
  46. Wash your pets on parts of your lawn that need water.
  47. Don’t throw out your pet’s old drinking water. Use it to water trees or plants.
  48. Install an instant water heater by your kitchen sink. This way, the water doesn’t need to run to heat up.
  49. Put leftover ice cubes in potted plants instead of throwing them out.
  50. Reusing your towels is a great way to save water.

If you follow these points, you’ll be sure to save lots of water.